Majesty Palm Care

Majesty Palm

Majesty Palm Care

The Majesty Palm, also known as the Ravenea rivularis, is a tropical palm tree that is native to Madagascar. It is a popular indoor and outdoor plant due to its elegant and striking appearance. The Majesty Palm can grow up to 30 feet tall in its natural habitat, but when grown in pots, it typically reaches between 6 and 8 feet tall.

Ravenea rivularis, the majestic palm, or majesty palm, is a species of tree in the family Arecaceae. They generally grow to 10 to 12 feet tall and are often marketed in stores as a “houseplant” in a pot, in its natural state, the majesty palm may sometimes grow to 98 feet (30 meters) tall.

The palm has upward-arching leaves divided into long, thin fingers. It is native to Madagascar; however, it is believed only about 900 plants are currently alive in the wild according to an assessment conducted in 2010. The species grows in several regions of Madagascar, but because those regions are totally surrounded and separated by desert, the natural spread of the species is limited. Despite its fragility as a species in the wild, it has become a very popular houseplant due to its beautiful leaves and slow-growing nature.

Adult Ravenea Rivularis, Florida USA

Ravenea rivularis grows in somewhat isolated humid habitats that are found in the otherwise dry, hot semi-arid climate of southwest Madagascar. Often, they grow huddled along the edges of riverbanks and natural lagoons, but also grow in shallow swamps where they receive ample water and humidity year-round. Due to its love for warm, moist air which can be difficult to provide consistently in most homes, the most common problem affecting those kept as houseplants is browning leaf tips. To replicate its natural growing conditions, plants should be misted with warm water daily or kept near a humidifier. It should also be watered more frequently than average houseplants especially in the spring and summer. That being said, fast-draining soil is preferable, such as soil labeled for cacti, in a well-draining container to allow water to seep through the root system and out of the pot. Although they can also suffer from lack of sunlight, Ravenea rivularis is much more sensitive to lack of water and humidity.

Majesty palms are often sold as cheap lush tropical foliage house plants but are hard to take care of for long term survivability.
In addition to ample water, Ravenea rivularis kept as a houseplant requires specialty fertilizer for palm trees which contains more magnesium than all-purpose fertilizers. Slow-release palm fertilizer with an NPK ratio of about 8-2-12 with at least 4% magnesium is ideal. A pinch of epsom salt may also be used as an alternative source of magnesium.

The leaves of the Majesty Palm are large and feathery, reaching up to 4 feet long. They are a glossy green color and are arranged in a graceful arching pattern. The trunk of the palm is slender and smooth, with a gray-brown color. The tree produces small, insignificant flowers that are followed by small, round berries.

The Majesty Palm prefers a well-draining soil that is rich in organic matter. It prefers a warm and humid environment, making it an ideal plant for a greenhouse or a conservatory. It can also be grown outdoors in tropical and subtropical climates.

When grown indoors, the Majesty Palm prefers bright, indirect light, and should be kept away from direct sunlight. It also prefers high humidity, so regular misting or placing a tray of water near the plant can help to maintain the necessary moisture levels.
The Majesty Palm is relatively low maintenance, but it does require regular watering and fertilization. It is also important to prune off any yellow or brown leaves as they appear, to keep the plant looking healthy and tidy.

Overall, the Majesty Palm is a beautiful and striking plant that can add a touch of elegance to any indoor or outdoor space. With proper care and maintenance, it can thrive for many years and become a cherished addition to any garden or home.

What Kind of Fertilizer for a Majesty Palm?

Palms are the kind of plant that does not go unnoticed in the landscape. Majesty palm (Ravenea rivularis) is a symmetrical, feather-leaved variety introduced from the rainforests of Madagascar. It is hardy in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 9 through 11, but is commonly grown as a houseplant in colder climates. Like other palms, it has exacting fertilizer requirements that are not met by generic, all-purpose fertilizers.

Nutrient Needs

Most garden centers sell fertilizer products formulated specifically for palm trees and these are perfect for majesty palms. These differ from most other fertilizers because the manufacturer includes magnesium, along with other trace elements. The ideal palm fertilizer has 8 percent nitrogen, 2 percent phosphorus, 12 percent potassium and 4 percent magnesium – these are indicated with the numbers 8-2-12-4 printed on the bag. Make sure to use slow-release fertilizers only.

Outdoor Fertilizer Application

Fertilize majesty palms planted in the ground every two months between April and September, for a total of three applications per year. Spread the fertilizer evenly over the root zone of the plant at a rate of 1.5 pounds of granular fertilizer for every 100 square feet of surface area. Spread the fertilizer on the ground in an area that corresponds to the size of the canopy, at a minimum. However, the roots of large majesty palms can extend far beyond the canopy, so spread the fertilizer to twice the size of the canopy on mature specimens.

Lawns and Palms

One challenge in growing majesty palms outdoors is the negative effects of lawn fertilizer on nearby palm trees. Lawn fertilizers have a high ratio of nitrogen to potassium that causes a nutritional imbalance in palms. Plus, they contain little or no magnesium, which is necessary for palm health. However, palm fertilizer can effectively meet the nutrient needs of lawn grass. As a general rule, use only palm fertilizer within 30 feet of the trunk of majesty palms – it will not harm grasses and other plants in the vicinity.

Potted Majesty Palms

Fertilize potted palms in a slightly different manner than plants in the ground; this holds true for the majesty palm as well. Potted palms need a higher proportion of nitrogen – use a liquid fertilizer labeled 18-6-12 for best results. The potting mix usually will supply magnesium in the form of dolomite, though the initial quantity may last only six months. You can repot majesty palm each year, or add dolomite at a rate of 1 pound per cubic foot of potting soil each year. Apply a slow-release liquid fertilizer every three months to potted palms.

It is, however, a somewhat tricky plant to grow successfully indoors, requiring humid air, lots of bright indirect light, and consistent moisture. It is often referred to by houseplant experts as a “challenging” plant.
When grown indoors, majesty palm will add about one foot of growth per year until it reaches four to six feet, then slows down dramatically. It is faster-growing as an outdoor plant where its roots are free to roam—it is occasionally used as a landscape tree in California, South Florida, and other tropical regions.

Types of Majesty Palm

There are no named cultivars of Ravenea rivularis. There are only about 20 species in the Ravenea genus, all of them considered seriously endangered. R. rivularis is the only species commonly cultivated for garden or houseplant use.

Pruning

Pruning duties are generally limited to simply removing any fronds that have turned brown or yellow. This is all that’s needed to keep the plant looking good.

Propagating Majesty Palm

Majesty palms are raised exclusively from seed, and commercial production of seeds is somewhat limited. It’s highly unlikely that home growers can get access to seeds. Propagation through stem cuttings is also not an option. However, division, or separating the offset “pups” from the mother palm, is a viable option. This method is best done when you need to repot the plant so the plant is not stressed by moving it around too much. Here are the steps for division:

Remove the plant from its pot by gently rolling it out of the container while it’s on its side. Do not yank the palm from its pot from an upright position.

Look for pups, or offshoots, from the mother plant that you can potentially separate from the root ball.

Massage the root ball with your fingers to relax and soften it so you can untangle the pups. To help separate roots, use a disinfected, sharp knife if needed. You can even trim the roots of the pups if they are too long for new pots.

Place offshoots in pots with fast-draining soil. Water the pots in a sink until it starts to drip from the bottom, but do not let the pot sit in water.

Put pots in a bright spot, like its mother plant. Fertilize the baby palms in about a month.

Potting and Repotting Majesty Palm

This palm may need to be repotted annually, but more likely every other year since it grows slowly. When repotting, be careful not to damage the root ball and use a large, heavy container to prevent the palm tree from tipping over. Pots made from clay or ceramic will help stabilize these plants, which can get top-heavy.

A standard potting mix blended with additional peat moss works well as a growing medium.

In cold-winter regions, it’s quite common to move these plants back and forth between an outdoor patio and an indoor location as the seasons shift. Make sure to get your plant indoors before freezing weather arrives.

Overwintering

During the winter, a majesty palm likes a slightly cooler temperature, 55 to 65 degrees Fahrenheit. Otherwise, winter care remains the same.

Salt Lake City, Utah

About Salt Lake City, Utah

Salt Lake City is the capital and most populous city of Utah, United States. It is the seat of Salt Lake County, the most populous county in Utah. With a population of 200,133 in 2020, the city is the core of the Salt Lake City metropolitan area, which had a population of 1,257,936 at the 2020 census. Salt Lake City is further situated within a larger metropolis known as the Salt Lake City–Ogden–Provo Combined Statistical Area, a corridor of contiguous urban and suburban development stretched along a 120-mile (190 km) segment of the Wasatch Front, comprising a population of 2,746,164, making it the 22nd largest in the nation. It is also the central core of the larger of only two major urban areas located within the Great Basin.

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Marissa Burton

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TruCo is a great company to work with for your commercial landscaping and snow removal needs! Rob is excellent to work with. He is very timely in providing quotes and has a lot of great feedback and suggestions to provide on what will look great, fit within your budget, and is knowledgeable on plants that will thrive with Utah's ever changing weather conditions. I have been impressed with TruCo's landscape maintenance as well as landscape projects which have had a quick turnaround time. I would highly recommend using TruCo!

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I experienced excellent all around service from landscape improvement design, scheduling and professional installation completed within the timeline we discussed. Rob, the manager does an excellent job of communicating, overseeing the install crew and making sure his customers are 100% satisfied with the job. Highly recommend TruCo for all landscaping needs.

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Michael the tree guy is so smart.  He knows all about tree removal, cutting and tree trimming services.  Truco did amazing work for me.  We had 16 very old and mature trees removed. The Truco team showed up on time ready to get the job done.  They did amazing with clean up truly respect your property and your life.  Communication was really good.  They needed to move some things to get the stump grinder to our yard they put things back with no issues.  Extremely professional and truly know what they're doing.  If anyone is looking for professional tree removal or tree service you really should call Jason or Michael at Truco.

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We hired TruCo to do a new install of sprinklers, sod, spigot, and bury downspouts. We even have a wifi transmitter for our control box we can access from an app on our phones! We absolutely love the professionalism and quality of their work!! Our sales rep Pete was the best to work with, we highly recommend him to anyone in the market for landscaping. It was awesome seeing the finished results and we're incredibly excited to enjoy our new space!

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TruCo installed all of our plants, trees and shrubs, drip lines, and boulders. Then they installed our amazing beautiful firepit. We loved the results and they guarantee all plants and trees up to a year. They were great and easy to work with. They listened to our needs and wants and met them 100%. Our HOA sent us a letter telling us they appreciate all the work and the way our yard looks and let us know we added value to the property. Win/Win

Tree Plants Indoor

Palm Plants Indoor

Tree Plants Indoor

Some Types of Tree Plants to Grow Indoors

With simple care tips, these tree plants can add lush greenery to your space.
An areca tree growing indoors.

The Spruce / Alonda Baird

Perhaps because of their association with tropical environments, indoor tree plants can elicit feelings of peace and relaxation like no other houseplant can. Trees are good indoor plants if you can provide the proper conditions for them. So indoor tree plant identification is key to know what your exact species needs.

Several types of indoor tree trees, including the areca tree and parlor tree, tolerate most household environments quite well. But there are some important factors to consider about indoor tree plant care.

Indoor Tree Plant Care Tips

How you care for an indoor tree plant is similar to many other houseplants that come from the tropics. Most types of indoor tree trees like the same conditions we find comfortable: warm temperatures, average humidity, and moderate light. Some indoor tree plants can even tolerate low light, though this usually will result in weaker growth.

Trees are generally slow-growing and need minimal pruning to clean up dead and broken fronds. They’ll require a quality tree fertilizer to help maintain lush growth. And you must watch out for common houseplant pests, such as spider mites and scale.

Here are some of the easiest trees to grow indoors to add a breezy, tropical feel to your home.

Chinese Fan Tree (Livistona chinensis)

Chinese fan tree with feathery frond leaves in white ceramic pot next to houseplants.

The Spruce / Kara Riley

The star-shaped leaves of Livistona chinensis set it apart from other trees with the more classic feathery fronds. While it’s slow-growing, this tree species’ mature height can reach 15 feet or greater. So it’s worth seeking out the subglobosa dwarf cultivar if you plan on growing the tree indoors.

Chinese fan trees do well in bright light, but younger plants can tolerate shady locations. Water when the top of the soil feels dry. Choose a large pot that will accommodate the long taproot that the Chinese fan tree produces. And feed this tree once a year in the spring with a slow-release fertilizer.

Light: Bright, indirect light; tolerates some shade

Water: Moderately moist soil

Color Varieties: Emerald green foliage

Areca Tree (Dypsis lutescens)

An areca tree growing indoors.

The Spruce / Alonda Baird

Also known as the bamboo tree, the areca tree (Dypsis lutescens) is one of the easiest trees to grow indoors thanks to its tolerance for low light. It produces large, feathery green fronds that have a gentle curve.

The areca tree prefers a moderate amount of water. Plant your areca tree in fertile soil, and give it a monthly fertilizer application to maintain a lush look.

Light: Sun or shade but looks its best in bright, indirect light

Water: Moderately moist soil

Color Varieties: Yellow-green stems and light green leaves

Majesty Tree (Ravenea rivularis)

Majestic tree in wicker basket with tall dark green fronds.

The Spruce / Kara Riley

The majesty tree (Ravenea rivularis) has two positive qualities that make it an ideal tree that will grow indoors: It is very shade tolerant, and it is a slow grower. However, you must be aware of two drawbacks of this tree: It needs constant moisture and humidity, and it will outgrow an indoor space over time.

If you can keep your majesty tree in a reasonably moist area, such as the kitchen or bathroom, then you can look forward to cultivating a graceful stand of dark green fronds that will add life to an empty corner of your home.

Light: Bright, indirect light for the entire day

Water: Consistently moist soil

Color Varieties: Bright green to dark green leaves

Cascade Tree (Chamaedorea cataractarum)

Green tree foliage tree isolated.

As opposed to some tree trees that feature a central trunk, Chamaedorea cataractarum is a very full tree with clumps of fronds eventually reaching 6 feet tall. You’ll be able to separate mature clumps, giving you new plant material to propagate by division.
In its native habitat, the cascade tree thrives along streams and in wet lowlands, so you must irrigate it frequently when growing it indoors. Fortunately for indoor growth, cascade trees are understory plants, so they can tolerate limited light.

Light: Bright, indirect light; tolerates shade; avoid direct sunlight

Water: Consistently moist soil

Color Varieties: Dark green leaves

Parlor Tree (Chamaedorea elegans)

Parlor tree in gold pot with small green fronds on shelf next to décor items.

The Spruce / Krystal Slagle

As the name suggests, the parlor tree (Chamaedorea elegans) is one of the easiest trees to grow indoors. It grows in average indoor light (or even artificial light) and typical room temperatures. And it requires no pruning other than an occasional tidying of dead branches.

Parlor trees flourish in above-average humidity. Be aware they might attract spider mites if conditions are very dry.

Light: Indirect light; avoid direct sun

Water: Consistently moist soil

Color Varieties: Light green leaves

Ponytail Tree (Beaucarnea recurvata)

Ponytail tree in white pot with long wispy fronds next to gold watering can and patterned pillows.

The Spruce / Lisa Ruschioni

Indoor tree plant identification should be fairly easy for the ponytail tree (Beaucarnea recurvata), with its short, sturdy trunk and gracefully arching leaves. In fact, this plant is not a true tree at all but rather a succulent.

The swollen trunk base isn’t just ornamental; it functions as a water reservoir for the plant, making it very drought tolerant. Give your ponytail tree a sunny location for optimal plant health. Moreover, it’s fine for the ponytail tree to become pot bound; in fact, this can keep growth manageable for a tabletop specimen.

Light: Full sun; tolerates bright, indirect light

Water: Moderately moist soil, will tolerate dry conditions

Color Varieties: Light green leaves

Sago Tree (Cycas revoluta)

Sago tree in white pot with shaggy pineapple-like trunk and feather-like fronds next to white watering can and window.

The Spruce / Anastasia Tretiak

If the sago tree is your first introduction to the world of indoor tree plants, you’re in for a treat. Stiff fronds grow in an upright habit from a short, shaggy trunk that resembles a pineapple. This plant (which is not a true tree but more closely related to conifers) is very slow-growing.

Choose an indoor location that receives filtered sun for four to six hours per day. The sago tree needs regular and consistent moisture, but make sure the soil surface is nearly dry between water applications.

Light: Full sun or bright, indirect light; tolerates some shade

Water: Moderately moist soil

Color Varieties: Light green leaves

The sago tree is toxic to humans and pets. So be mindful about its placement as a houseplant if you have kids or animals.

Yucca Tree (Yucca elephantipes)

Yucca tree with sharp leaves in corner of living room.

The Spruce / Krystal Slagle

Indoor tree plant identification is very important when it comes to yucca trees. Yucca aloifolia, also known as the Spanish bayonet, has razor-sharp leaves and belongs outdoors. Yucca elephantipes is the spineless yucca tree, and while its leaves do have a pointy tip, the plant is unlikely to draw blood like its spiny cousin.

You might also see the indoor yucca tree sold under the name “stick yucca.” Tough strappy green leaves emerge from an attractive trunk on the yucca tree. The plants are very drought tolerant and grow in full sun or part shade.

Light: Full sun to part shade

Water: Moderately moist soil

Color Varieties: Light green to bluish-green

Tree plant Care

Successfully growing tree plant requires carefully balancing several factors: heat, light, and fertilization. Plants that are over-fertilized and grown in warm conditions, but not given enough light, will stretch out looking for more. Plants that are given too much light without a corresponding increase in fertilizer and water will scorch. The right balance indoors likely means a bright corner, with plenty of water, and less fertilizer than you probably think.

Tree plant has a reputation for being somewhat of a temperamental plant. Although tree plants are understory plants in their natural habitat, indoors it’s a good idea to provide as much light as possible. Plants that are stretching and bleached should be moved into a brighter spot for a few weeks, but don’t expose them to full sunlight.

Soil

These trees are acid-loving plants that do best with a pH level as low as 5.0, so don’t worry about a peat-based mixture acidifying and hurting your tree plant. A standard potting mix, with some extra peat mixed in, is an ideal growing medium for tree plants1. These trees need good drainage to prevent water-logged roots.

Water

Keep the potting media evenly moist, but not waterlogged. Don’t let the plant’s soil get too dry between watering or you’ll start to lose lower leaves.

Temperature and Humidity

This plant will grow fairly well in temperatures between 65 and 85 degrees Fahrenheit. It prefers high humidity but can survive in ordinary household humidity levels. In colder climates where winter air can get very dry; running a humidifier can make the plants happier. Misting the plant daily will also ensure it gets the humidity it craves. Low humidity levels can encourage insect pests.

American Fork, Utah

About American Fork, Utah

American Fork is a city in north-central Utah County, Utah, United States, at the foot of Mount Timpanogos in the Wasatch Range, north from Utah Lake. This city is thirty-two miles southeast of Salt Lake City. It is part of the Provo–Orem Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 33,337 in 2020. The city has grown rapidly since the 1970s.

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Truco Services, Inc. Reviews

Marissa Burton

starstarstarstarstar (5)

TruCo is a great company to work with for your commercial landscaping and snow removal needs! Rob is excellent to work with. He is very timely in providing quotes and has a lot of great feedback and suggestions to provide on what will look great, fit within your budget, and is knowledgeable on plants that will thrive with Utah's ever changing weather conditions. I have been impressed with TruCo's landscape maintenance as well as landscape projects which have had a quick turnaround time. I would highly recommend using TruCo!

Truco Services, Inc. Reviews

Yvonne Olson

starstarstarstarstar (5)

I experienced excellent all around service from landscape improvement design, scheduling and professional installation completed within the timeline we discussed. Rob, the manager does an excellent job of communicating, overseeing the install crew and making sure his customers are 100% satisfied with the job. Highly recommend TruCo for all landscaping needs.

Truco Services, Inc. Reviews

Heather Whiting

starstarstarstarstar (5)

We hired TruCo to do a new install of sprinklers, sod, spigot, and bury downspouts. We even have a wifi transmitter for our control box we can access from an app on our phones! We absolutely love the professionalism and quality of their work!! Our sales rep Pete was the best to work with, we highly recommend him to anyone in the market for landscaping. It was awesome seeing the finished results and we're incredibly excited to enjoy our new space!

Truco Services, Inc. Reviews

Jan Merideth

starstarstarstarstar (5)

TruCo installed all of our plants, trees and shrubs, drip lines, and boulders. Then they installed our amazing beautiful firepit. We loved the results and they guarantee all plants and trees up to a year. They were great and easy to work with. They listened to our needs and wants and met them 100%. Our HOA sent us a letter telling us they appreciate all the work and the way our yard looks and let us know we added value to the property. Win/Win

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Avoid working for this company. They will promise you things to get you in, then tell you there is no documentation about said things. Extremely unprofessional. Update to response - please dont try to justify. PTO was promised by the hiring manager on day 1 due to the conditions. Your company refusing to honor the agreement and tell me that there is no documentation is the problem. I quit after being told that you would not honor the PTO, not before.

Ponytail Palm Plant Care

Ponytail Palm Plant Care

Ponytail Palm Plant Care

Ponytail Palm Plant Profile

The ponytail palm (Beaucarnea recurvata) makes a surprisingly interesting desktop plant, considering that when grown outdoors it can be a full-size tree that towers over homes. When planted outside in full sun, ponytail palms can reach 30 feet tall, but they typically stay closer to 6 feet tall at maturity when grown indoors. Despite the common name and the appearance of the foliage, this plant is not a true palm, but rather a member of the Asparagaceae family that includes edible asparagus.

Indoors, these novel little trees are often grown in shallow pots, with a tuft of strappy green leaves emerging from a bulbous stem that seems to erupt from the soil. (The bulbous trunk is the source of one of its common names, “elephant’s foot.”) Given time and the right conditions, a small desktop plant will grow into respectable specimen plants, up to 6 feet in height or more. Ponytail palm is native to arid regions in Central America and is among the easiest of small trees to grow indoors.

When planted outdoors, spring is the traditional planting time, though a ponytail palm can be planted at almost any time. This is a very slow-growing, long-lived species. It may take five years or more for a 1-foot-tall plant to double in size.

Botanical Name Beaucarnea recurvata
Common Name Ponytail palm, elephant’s foot
Plant Type Broadleaf evergreen shrub/ tree
Mature Size 6 to 8 feet tall; 3- to 5-foot spread (up to 30 feet tall when planted outdoors)
Sun Exposure Full sun
Soil Type Sandy, well-draining soil
Soil pH 6.5 to 7.5 (neutral)
Bloom Time Seasonal bloomer
Flower Color Creamy white
Hardiness Zones 10 to 11 (USDA); usually grown as a houseplant
Native Area Semi-desert areas of Central America

How to Grow a Ponytail Palm

Ponytail palm can be grown as an outdoor plant only in USDA Zones 10 and 11, where it prefers a sandy soil in a full-sun location. When grown outdoors, it is best planted in a cactus/succulent potting mix and placed in the sunniest spot you can find; in the right location, it is largely trouble-free, provided it gets a modest amount of water at regular intervals.

As an indoor plant, the ponytail is basically a “plant it and forget it” kind of plant, providing it has enough light to thrive and somewhat steady water throughout the growing season. Keep in mind, though, that the ponytail palm is an extremely slow-growing plant, so don’t expect your desktop plant to transform into a corner specimen in one or two growing seasons.

Light

Ponytail palms like full sun or bright indirect light. When grown as an indoor plant, situate it in the brightest location you can find—a window that gets direct sun or plenty of indirect light.

Soil

This plant is native to semi-desert areas of Central America, and when planted outdoors it does best in relatively sandy but organically rich soil. As in indoor plant, it does well in a cactus/succulent potting mix augmented with peat to improve its richness.

Water

For potted indoor plants, water a ponytail palm during the growing season every seven to 14 days. The bulbous stem stores water, so be careful not to overwater it. During the winter season, cut back watering to monthly.
A ponytail palm planted in the garden rarely needs to be watered if you get any kind of regular rain. In dry climates or during periods of drought, a modest watering every two weeks is sufficient.

Temperature and Humidity

Ponytail palms prefer warm, arid temperatures, above 60 degrees Fahrenheit. However, they will survive down to 50 degrees Fahrenheit, providing these temps are not prolonged.

Fertilizer

Feed weekly with liquid fertilizer during the growing season, or use a slow-release pellet fertilizer in the spring. Reduce feeding during the winter.

Potting and Repotting

For growing indoors, pot a ponytail palm in a smallish container filled with a cactus/ succulent potting mix that is blended with some peat. Repot in the spring as needed. If your goal is to grow a large palm tree, repot it every year, but if you want to keep it smaller, repot every two or three years. Ponytail palms will thrive when slightly underpotted in a container that confines the roots.

Propagating Ponytail Palms

Ponytail palms sometimes develop offsets (“pups”) from the base, which can be removed and potted up individually. Generally, however, this is a difficult task to master because of a lack of roots on the offsets. If you want to try, use a rooting hormone to stimulate new root growth on the offset. A ponytail palm rarely (if ever) flowers indoors to produce viable seeds.

Pruning a Ponytail Palm

Damaged leaves should have the tips trimmed off back to healthy tissue. If the offsets (“pups”) send up secondary shoots, you can prune these away to maintain a central trunk and classic tree-like appearance. However, a multi-stemmed tree is often desirable, and many people welcome these secondary shoots.

Common Pests/Diseases

Like most houseplants, a ponytail palm can be susceptible to spider mites, mealybugs, and scale. Horticultural soaps or oils are good non-toxic methods for controlling these pests.

Potential but rare disease problems include leaf spots, stem rots, and bacterial leaf streak. Watering too much is the most common cause of fungal problems and stem rot.

Ponytail palms are unique-looking, long-lived indoor plants that thrive on benign neglect. They are very easy to grow, provided that you don’t overwater them! Here’s how to grow and care for a ponytail palm in your home.

About Ponytail Palms

Despite its name and palm-like appearance, the ponytail palm is not a true “palm.” In fact, it is more closely related to desert plants in the Agave and Yucca genera (such as Joshua trees).

The typical ponytail palm consists of a large, domed “stump,” which tapers off into a thinner stem. From the top of the stem, one or more rosettes of long, green, leathery leaves develop as the plant ages. Indoors, the leaves can get up to 3 feet long, but outdoors, they may be double that length.

In its native environment (eastern Mexico), the entire plant has been known to reach up to 30 feet in height! However, ponytail palms that are grown in gardens as landscape plants don’t usually get to be more than 10 feet tall. Kept indoors, they are rarely taller than 4 feet.

Care of this plant is generally simple; the most common difficulty is having to adapt your watering habits to its watering needs!

PLANTING

Choosing Soil and a Pot
Use a fast draining soil, such as a cacti and succulent potting mix. If you have potting soil, sand, and perlite already on hand, you can create your own desert soil mixture: Simply mix 1 part potting soil, 1 part perlite, and 1 part sand.
Select a pot that has a hole in the bottom, so that excess water can be drained off. Ponytail palms do not like to sit in moist soil for very long.

Use a clay pot if possible; the porous material will absorb some of the water, drying out the soil more quickly (a good thing for cacti and succulents).

GROWING

How to Care for Ponytail Palms
Ponytail palms prefer to have as much light as possible, so place the plant in a bright location. Bright, indirect sunlight is best.
Keep soil fairly dry. Water from spring through fall, allowing the top inch or two of soil to dry completely before re-watering. During the winter, only water occasionally.

To water, soak the soil and allow the excess water to drain through the bottom of the pot into a dish. Let the pot sit in the dish for several minutes, then dump out any remaining water in the dish.

Fertilize in the spring with a cacti/succulent fertilizer and bring into a brighter room for the summer months.

Normal room temperature is fine for most of the year, but keep the plant slightly cooler in the winter (50-55°F / 10-13°C) to replicate the natural dormancy cycle.

During winter, don’t let the plant sit too close to cold windows at night, as it can be severely damaged by freezing temperatures.

Repotting a Ponytail Palm

Ponytail palms will remain small if kept in a small pot. They can go for many years before needing to be repotted. Repotting every other year at the most is all a ponytail palm needs.

Moving the plant to a larger pot will give it room to grow in both height and girth. However, older plants may become difficult to manage due to their sheer size and weight if not kept on the smaller size.
When selecting a new pot, pick one large enough to leave about an inch or so of space between the ponytail palm’s trunk and the rim of the pot.

Note: Use caution when handling a ponytail palm, as its leaves have tiny serrated edges.

HARVESTING

Propagation

Rarely, a ponytail palm may produce an offset—a small baby plant that stems from the base of the adult plant. These can be cut off at the base when they reach at least 4 inches in height and planted in a succulent potting mix. Before planting, allow the cut wound to heal, then apply a bit of rooting hormone (available online and in nurseries) to encourage the offset to root.

WIT AND WISDOM

The plant’s unusual shape and coloration has granted it another strange nickname: the Elephant’s Foot Palm.
Are ponytail palms poisonous to cats? While the leaves of a ponytail palm are not toxic to feline (or canine) companions, their foliage does have abrasive edges that could irritate a pet’s mouth, so we suggest keeping the plant out of reach.

PESTS/DISEASES

Overwatering can result in stem rot. If you withhold watering, the plant may be able to internally remedy the problem. Signs of stem rot include yellowing leaves and a caudex (the plant’s base and stem) that is soft or squishy.

Spider mites and scale insects may find their way to the leaves, but can be dealt with by rubbing a cloth of dish soap and water on the stems. Spider mites are evidenced by the presence of spider-like webbing on the plant.

Brown tips on leaves can be a sign of over fertilizing or under watering, so adjust your husbandry practices appropriately. They can also be a sign that the plant is getting too much direct sunlight and too little water.

Draper, Utah

About Draper, Utah

Draper is a city in Salt Lake and Utah counties in the U.S. state of Utah, about 20 miles (32 km) south of Salt Lake City along the Wasatch Front. As of the 2020 census, the population is 51,017, up from 7,143 in 1990.

Neighborhoods in Draper, Utah

Willowbrook Estates

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Reviews for Truco Services, Inc. Draper, Utah

Truco Services, Inc. Reviews

Marissa Burton

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TruCo is a great company to work with for your commercial landscaping and snow removal needs! Rob is excellent to work with. He is very timely in providing quotes and has a lot of great feedback and suggestions to provide on what will look great, fit within your budget, and is knowledgeable on plants that will thrive with Utah's ever changing weather conditions. I have been impressed with TruCo's landscape maintenance as well as landscape projects which have had a quick turnaround time. I would highly recommend using TruCo!

Truco Services, Inc. Reviews

Yvonne Olson

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I experienced excellent all around service from landscape improvement design, scheduling and professional installation completed within the timeline we discussed. Rob, the manager does an excellent job of communicating, overseeing the install crew and making sure his customers are 100% satisfied with the job. Highly recommend TruCo for all landscaping needs.

Truco Services, Inc. Reviews

Raymond Ferraro

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Michael the tree guy is so smart.  He knows all about tree removal, cutting and tree trimming services.  Truco did amazing work for me.  We had 16 very old and mature trees removed. The Truco team showed up on time ready to get the job done.  They did amazing with clean up truly respect your property and your life.  Communication was really good.  They needed to move some things to get the stump grinder to our yard they put things back with no issues.  Extremely professional and truly know what they're doing.  If anyone is looking for professional tree removal or tree service you really should call Jason or Michael at Truco.

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Heather Whiting

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We hired TruCo to do a new install of sprinklers, sod, spigot, and bury downspouts. We even have a wifi transmitter for our control box we can access from an app on our phones! We absolutely love the professionalism and quality of their work!! Our sales rep Pete was the best to work with, we highly recommend him to anyone in the market for landscaping. It was awesome seeing the finished results and we're incredibly excited to enjoy our new space!

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Jan Merideth

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TruCo installed all of our plants, trees and shrubs, drip lines, and boulders. Then they installed our amazing beautiful firepit. We loved the results and they guarantee all plants and trees up to a year. They were great and easy to work with. They listened to our needs and wants and met them 100%. Our HOA sent us a letter telling us they appreciate all the work and the way our yard looks and let us know we added value to the property. Win/Win

Planting A Lemon Tree

Planting A Lemon Tree

Planting A Lemon Tree

How to plant and grow lemons

Lemon trees make an excellent addition to almost every backyard and if you get the growing process right, you’re ensured a regular, plentiful crop. The good news? It’s easier than you think to grow your own lemons – great news for all the foodies out there!

Lemon tree varieties

The most common varieties grown in Australia are Eureka, Lisbon and Meyer. Eureka produces its main crop in winter with smaller crops in spring and summer. Eureka lemons have relatively few seeds and the tree is virtually thornless growing to around four metres in height.
Lisbon is thornier and produces its main crop in winter and tends to be more cold tolerant. It grows around three to four metres tall.
Meyers has a milder, less acidic flavour with a smooth, thin rind. Its main crop is produced in winter but it can crop continuously throughout the year. It’s a small tree growing to around two metres in height, making it the ideal lemon tree to grow in a pot.

How to grow a lemon tree

Climate

The preferred climate depends on the variety of lemon, however most do well in warm climates. They tolerate drought but are sensitive to frost.

Aspect

Lemon trees require a position in full sunlight that is protected from winds and frost. If you’re growing a lemon tree in a cooler climate, plant it close to a brick wall so it can utilise the radiating heat.

Soil

Lemon trees can tolerate a range of different soils but they mostly prefer slightly acidic, well-drained soil.

Planting

You can plant lemon trees at any time of year in warmer climates, as long as you water regularly. In cold regions plant in spring to protect it from late frosts.

Citrus will thrive in large pots – choose one that is 50cm in diameter or more, with plenty of drainage holes, and fill with a premium quality potting mix. It’s a great idea to stand your pot on a trolley so you can easily move the pot to a sunnier or more protected position with the changing seasons.

If you’re planting a lemon tree in the garden, start by digging a hole twice a wide and as deep as the pot your citrus comes in. Remove it from the pot and inspect the roots, untangling any that appear to be circling around or those that are tightly packed into the shape of the pot. Plant so that the original soil level in the pot is level with your garden soil. Backfill the hole with the removed crumbled soil, and work compost or well-rotted cow manure into the top 10cm of soil. Add a mulch of straw to the soil surface, but keep this away from the trunk. Water immediately after planting and from then on keep the soil slightly moist.

Water

Lemons grow best in soils that are moist but not soggy. Water your tree every seven to 10 days during the summer, providing it with 4 to 6 inches of water each month. Allow the soil around mature trees to partially dry between waterings. Overwatered lemon trees may suffer from crown and root rots, while those not watered enough frequently shed blossoms and don’t produce as much fruit.

Feeding

Citrus produce loads of fruit! All that flowering and fruiting is a big consumer of energy so make sure you feed up your lemon tree to ensure further crops. You can tell if your tree is undernourished by poor stunted growth or yellowing leaves. Feed twice a year with citrus food, once in February and again in August. Follow the directions on the packet and water the soil well both before and after applying the fertiliser.

How to prune lemon trees

Pruning lemon trees is important for growing healthier and more plentiful fruit.

It’s best to prune your lemon tree from late winter to early spring, right after harvest. Young trees should be pruned to establish a good shape, remove any sprouts or weak limbs so the plant can focus on growing a strong canopy.

When to harvest your lemons

Lemon trees generally take around two to three years to bear fruit and harvesting depends on the variety of plant. Eurekas produce fruit two to three time a year while Lisbons fruit once a year.

Lemons are ready to harvest when they have developed full colour and flavour. Harvest lemons when their peels are yellow or only a green tinge, with a slightly glossy appearance. The longer the fruit stays on the tree the sweeter it will become so some suggest picking and tasting your fruit to determine how the crop is developing.

To pick lemons, use the twist, tilt and snap method. Take the entire fruit in your hand and twist it gently, tilting and pulling away until it breaks free.

How to propagate a lemon tree

To propagate a lemon tree it’s best to take a cutting in late spring or early summer. Choose a 15 centimetre piece of a healthy young branch without fruit or flowers and at least two to three nodes at the base. Us a non-serrated, sanitised knife to cut the stem at a 90-degree angle. Wrap cuttings in a moist paper towel to prevent dehydration.

Remove bottom leaves so the cutting has only three or so leaves at the top and dust the bottom with a hormone-based rooting powder. Plant the cutting in a large, well-draining pot with seed starter mix and cover it with a large clear plastic bag to create a warm, humid environment. Use chopsticks, wire or dowel to keep the bag from resting on the cutting. Keep the soil moist.

Once roots develop, remove the plastic covering. After a few days move the cutting outside in a sheltered location. Once the roots of the plant nearly fill its pot its time to plant it in a larger pot or garden.

Pests and disease

Scale insect: Found on stems and leaves, they have a waxy brown shell. Spray these sap-sucking insects with organic eco oil.

Leaf Miner: Tiny burrowing mites causing silvery trails and twisted leaves. They attack only fresh new leaves, so spray the new growth once a fortnight with eco oil until the leaves have matured and turned a dark green colour.

Stink bugs: May appear in large numbers from October. Knock them off the branches and squish them underfoot, but wear protective goggles as then bugs can squirt a painful liquid into your eyes.

Sooty mould: A black crusty coating on the leaves indicating the presence of a sap-sucking insect lurking higher up, such as aphids, scale or mealybugs. Treat the insect above and the sooty mould will clear up by itself. The mould is not harmful, it just looks yucky.

As long as you provide their basic needs, growing lemons can be a very rewarding experience. Outdoors Lemons are more cold-sensitive than all other citrus trees. Due to this cold sensitivity, lemon trees should be planted near the south side of the home. Lemon trees need protection from frost. Growing them near the house should help with this. Lemon trees also require full sunlight for adequate growth. While lemon trees can tolerate a range of soils, including poor soil, most prefer well-drained, slightly acidic soil. Lemon trees should be set slightly higher than ground. Therefore, dig a hole somewhat shallower than the length of the root ball. Place the tree in the hole and replace soil, tamping firmly as you go. Water sufficiently and add some mulch to help retain moisture. Lemon trees require deep watering once weekly. If necessary, pruning may be done to maintain their shape and height. Indoors Lemons can make excellent houseplants and will be comfortable in a container as long it provides adequate drainage and room for growth. Heights of around 3 to 5 feet (1-1.5 m.) can be expected for a lemon tree growing indoors. They also prefer well-draining, slightly acidic soil. Keep the soil evenly moist and fertilize as needed. Lemon trees thrive within a normal temperature range of about 70 F. (21 C.) throughout the day and 55 F. (13 C.) at night. Keep in mind that they will usually go into dormancy when temperatures fall below 55 F. (13 C.) Lemon trees require lots of light; therefore, they may need to be supplemented with fluorescent grow lights during winter. Explore More Lemon trees can be placed outdoors during warm periods, which is also recommended in order to increase their chances of bearing fruit. When you grow a lemon tree indoors, bees and other insects are unable to pollinate them.

Therefore, you should place them outdoors during summer unless you want to hand pollinate. Propagating for Lemon Tree Cultivation Many lemon trees are container-grown, purchased straight from the nursery. However, they can be propagated through cuttings, air layering, and seeds. The variety usually dictates the best method used; yet, different people see different results using different methods. Therefore, it’s best to find the method that works for you. The majority find it easier to propagate lemons by rooting large cuttings. While seeds can be used, the seedlings are usually slow to bear. When choosing to grow from seeds, allow them to dry out for a week or two. Once dried, plant the seeds about an inch deep in good potting soil and cover with clear plastic wrap. Set the pot in a sunny location and wait for it to reach 6 to 12 inches (15-30 cm.) before transplanting outdoors or to another pot.

Murray, Utah

About Murray, Utah

Murray is a city situated on the Wasatch Front in the core of Salt Lake Valley in the U.S. state of Utah. Named for territorial governor Eli Murray, it is the state's fourteenth largest city. According to the 2020 census, Murray had a population of 50,637. Murray shares borders with Taylorsville, Holladay, South Salt Lake and West Jordan, Utah. Once teeming with heavy industry, Murray's industrial sector now has little trace and has been replaced by major mercantile sectors. Known for its central location in Salt Lake County, Murray has been called the Hub of Salt Lake County. Unlike most of its neighboring communities, Murray operates its own police, fire, power, water, library, and parks and recreation departments and has its own school district. While maintaining many of its own services, Murray has one of the lowest city tax rates in the state.

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Reviews for Truco Services, Inc. Murray, Utah

Truco Services, Inc. Reviews

Emily Abercrombie

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We had a great experience with TruCo! They were well priced, responsive and prompt. Michael was a pleasure to work with and gave us advice on which plants to put in where we took out our ugly old shrubs. I would highly recommend this company!!!

Truco Services, Inc. Reviews

Michelle Turpin

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TruCo Services gets 5 stars from us for customer service. We experienced a few issues with their services this last year and Rob Eccles in senior management, stepped in and immediately handled our issues. He was very committed to making sure they understood our expectations and would execute to make us happy.

Truco Services, Inc. Reviews

Siobhan Billingsley

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I work for a property management company and have the pleasure of working with Rob at a community in Sandy. He has been incredible to work with and always responds in a timely manner. He knows all the homeowners by name and address and is aware of all the "problem" areas when it comes to sprinklers. I never have to worry about following up with him because he always reaches out to provide me with an update. If you're looking to work with someone who takes pride in their job, is professional, and can solve the worst landscaping problems thrown your way, Rob is your guy. Thank you, Rob for all you do!

Truco Services, Inc. Reviews

Jaime S.

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We have used Truco at 2 of the complexes we manage, they have been great to work with. Good quality service, outstanding customer service with good communication. That's hard to find these days. I highly recommend them. Travis has been awesome to work with.

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Jerusha Smart

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We use TruCo for a majority of our properties and our home. While other landscaping companies we use come and go for various reasons like cost, communication issues, work performance, etc., TruCo is always consistent in price and work. Also, Rob is the best.

Majesty Palm

Majesty Palm

Majesty Palm

The Majesty Palm, also known as the Ravenea rivularis, is a tropical palm tree that is native to Madagascar. It is a popular indoor and outdoor plant due to its elegant and striking appearance. The Majesty Palm can grow up to 30 feet tall in its natural habitat, but when grown in pots, it typically reaches between 6 and 8 feet tall.

The leaves of the Majesty Palm are large and feathery, reaching up to 4 feet long. They are a glossy green color and are arranged in a graceful arching pattern. The trunk of the palm is slender and smooth, with a gray-brown color. The tree produces small, insignificant flowers that are followed by small, round berries.

The Majesty Palm prefers a well-draining soil that is rich in organic matter. It prefers a warm and humid environment, making it an ideal plant for a greenhouse or a conservatory. It can also be grown outdoors in tropical and subtropical climates.

When grown indoors, the Majesty Palm prefers bright, indirect light, and should be kept away from direct sunlight. It also prefers high humidity, so regular misting or placing a tray of water near the plant can help to maintain the necessary moisture levels.

The Majesty Palm is relatively low maintenance, but it does require regular watering and fertilization. It is also important to prune off any yellow or brown leaves as they appear, to keep the plant looking healthy and tidy.

Overall, the Majesty Palm is a beautiful and striking plant that can add a touch of elegance to any indoor or outdoor space. With proper care and maintenance, it can thrive for many years and become a cherished addition to any garden or home.

Ravenea rivularis, the majestic palm, or majesty palm, is a species of tree in the family Arecaceae. They generally grow to 10 to 12 feet tall and are often marketed in stores as a “houseplant” in a pot, in its natural state, the majesty palm may sometimes grow to 98 feet (30 meters) tall.

The palm has upward-arching leaves divided into long, thin fingers. It is native to Madagascar; however, it is believed only about 900 plants are currently alive in the wild according to an assessment conducted in 2010. The species grows in several regions of Madagascar, but because those regions are totally surrounded and separated by desert, the natural spread of the species is limited. Despite its fragility as a species in the wild, it has become a very popular houseplant due to its beautiful leaves and slow-growing nature.

Adult Ravenea Rivularis, Florida USA

Ravenea rivularis grows in somewhat isolated humid habitats that are found in the otherwise dry, hot semi-arid climate of southwest Madagascar. Often, they grow huddled along the edges of riverbanks and natural lagoons, but also grow in shallow swamps where they receive ample water and humidity year-round. Due to its love for warm, moist air which can be difficult to provide consistently in most homes, the most common problem affecting those kept as houseplants is browning leaf tips. To replicate its natural growing conditions, plants should be misted with warm water daily or kept near a humidifier. It should also be watered more frequently than average houseplants especially in the spring and summer. That being said, fast-draining soil is preferable, such as soil labeled for cacti, in a well-draining container to allow water to seep through the root system and out of the pot. Although they can also suffer from lack of sunlight, Ravenea rivularis is much more sensitive to lack of water and humidity.

Majesty palms are often sold as cheap lush tropical foliage house plants but are hard to take care of for long term survivability.
In addition to ample water, Ravenea rivularis kept as a houseplant requires specialty fertilizer for palm trees which contains more magnesium than all-purpose fertilizers. Slow-release palm fertilizer with an NPK ratio of about 8-2-12 with at least 4% magnesium is ideal. A pinch of epsom salt may also be used as an alternative source of magnesium.

What Kind of Fertilizer for a Majesty Palm?

Palms are the kind of plant that does not go unnoticed in the landscape. Majesty palm (Ravenea rivularis) is a symmetrical, feather-leaved variety introduced from the rainforests of Madagascar. It is hardy in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 9 through 11, but is commonly grown as a houseplant in colder climates. Like other palms, it has exacting fertilizer requirements that are not met by generic, all-purpose fertilizers.

Nutrient Needs

Most garden centers sell fertilizer products formulated specifically for palm trees and these are perfect for majesty palms. These differ from most other fertilizers because the manufacturer includes magnesium, along with other trace elements. The ideal palm fertilizer has 8 percent nitrogen, 2 percent phosphorus, 12 percent potassium and 4 percent magnesium – these are indicated with the numbers 8-2-12-4 printed on the bag. Make sure to use slow-release fertilizers only.

Outdoor Fertilizer Application

Fertilize majesty palms planted in the ground every two months between April and September, for a total of three applications per year. Spread the fertilizer evenly over the root zone of the plant at a rate of 1.5 pounds of granular fertilizer for every 100 square feet of surface area. Spread the fertilizer on the ground in an area that corresponds to the size of the canopy, at a minimum. However, the roots of large majesty palms can extend far beyond the canopy, so spread the fertilizer to twice the size of the canopy on mature specimens.

Lawns and Palms

One challenge in growing majesty palms outdoors is the negative effects of lawn fertilizer on nearby palm trees. Lawn fertilizers have a high ratio of nitrogen to potassium that causes a nutritional imbalance in palms. Plus, they contain little or no magnesium, which is necessary for palm health. However, palm fertilizer can effectively meet the nutrient needs of lawn grass. As a general rule, use only palm fertilizer within 30 feet of the trunk of majesty palms – it will not harm grasses and other plants in the vicinity.

Potted Majesty Palms

Fertilize potted palms in a slightly different manner than plants in the ground; this holds true for the majesty palm as well. Potted palms need a higher proportion of nitrogen – use a liquid fertilizer labeled 18-6-12 for best results. The potting mix usually will supply magnesium in the form of dolomite, though the initial quantity may last only six months. You can repot majesty palm each year, or add dolomite at a rate of 1 pound per cubic foot of potting soil each year. Apply a slow-release liquid fertilizer every three months to potted palms.

It is, however, a somewhat tricky plant to grow successfully indoors, requiring humid air, lots of bright indirect light, and consistent moisture. It is often referred to by houseplant experts as a “challenging” plant.

When grown indoors, majesty palm will add about one foot of growth per year until it reaches four to six feet, then slows down dramatically. It is faster-growing as an outdoor plant where its roots are free to roam—it is occasionally used as a landscape tree in California, South Florida, and other tropical regions.

Types of Majesty Palm

There are no named cultivars of Ravenea rivularis. There are only about 20 species in the Ravenea genus, all of them considered seriously endangered. R. rivularis is the only species commonly cultivated for garden or houseplant use.

Pruning

Pruning duties are generally limited to simply removing any fronds that have turned brown or yellow. This is all that’s needed to keep the plant looking good.

Propagating Majesty Palm

Majesty palms are raised exclusively from seed, and commercial production of seeds is somewhat limited. It’s highly unlikely that home growers can get access to seeds. Propagation through stem cuttings is also not an option. However, division, or separating the offset “pups” from the mother palm, is a viable option. This method is best done when you need to repot the plant so the plant is not stressed by moving it around too much. Here are the steps for division:

Remove the plant from its pot by gently rolling it out of the container while it’s on its side. Do not yank the palm from its pot from an upright position.

Look for pups, or offshoots, from the mother plant that you can potentially separate from the root ball.

Massage the root ball with your fingers to relax and soften it so you can untangle the pups. To help separate roots, use a disinfected, sharp knife if needed. You can even trim the roots of the pups if they are too long for new pots.

Place offshoots in pots with fast-draining soil. Water the pots in a sink until it starts to drip from the bottom, but do not let the pot sit in water.

Put pots in a bright spot, like its mother plant. Fertilize the baby palms in about a month.

Potting and Repotting Majesty Palm

This palm may need to be repotted annually, but more likely every other year since it grows slowly. When repotting, be careful not to damage the root ball and use a large, heavy container to prevent the palm tree from tipping over. Pots made from clay or ceramic will help stabilize these plants, which can get top-heavy.

A standard potting mix blended with additional peat moss works well as a growing medium.

In cold-winter regions, it’s quite common to move these plants back and forth between an outdoor patio and an indoor location as the seasons shift. Make sure to get your plant indoors before freezing weather arrives.

Overwintering

During the winter, a majesty palm likes a slightly cooler temperature, 55 to 65 degrees Fahrenheit. Otherwise, winter care remains the same.

Logan, Utah

About Logan, Utah

Logan is a city in Cache County, Utah, United States. The 2020 census recorded the population was 52,778. Logan is the county seat of Cache County and the principal city of the Logan metropolitan area, which includes Cache County and Franklin County, Idaho. The Logan metropolitan area contained 125,442 people as of the 2010 census and was declared by Morgan Quitno in 2005 and 2007 to be the safest in the United States in those years. Logan also is the location of the main campus of Utah State University.

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Reviews for Truco Services, Inc. Logan, Utah

Truco Services, Inc. Reviews

Marissa Burton

starstarstarstarstar (5)

TruCo is a great company to work with for your commercial landscaping and snow removal needs! Rob is excellent to work with. He is very timely in providing quotes and has a lot of great feedback and suggestions to provide on what will look great, fit within your budget, and is knowledgeable on plants that will thrive with Utah's ever changing weather conditions. I have been impressed with TruCo's landscape maintenance as well as landscape projects which have had a quick turnaround time. I would highly recommend using TruCo!

Truco Services, Inc. Reviews

Yvonne Olson

starstarstarstarstar (5)

I experienced excellent all around service from landscape improvement design, scheduling and professional installation completed within the timeline we discussed. Rob, the manager does an excellent job of communicating, overseeing the install crew and making sure his customers are 100% satisfied with the job. Highly recommend TruCo for all landscaping needs.

Truco Services, Inc. Reviews

Raymond Ferraro

starstarstarstarstar (5)

Michael the tree guy is so smart.  He knows all about tree removal, cutting and tree trimming services.  Truco did amazing work for me.  We had 16 very old and mature trees removed. The Truco team showed up on time ready to get the job done.  They did amazing with clean up truly respect your property and your life.  Communication was really good.  They needed to move some things to get the stump grinder to our yard they put things back with no issues.  Extremely professional and truly know what they're doing.  If anyone is looking for professional tree removal or tree service you really should call Jason or Michael at Truco.

Truco Services, Inc. Reviews

Heather Whiting

starstarstarstarstar (5)

We hired TruCo to do a new install of sprinklers, sod, spigot, and bury downspouts. We even have a wifi transmitter for our control box we can access from an app on our phones! We absolutely love the professionalism and quality of their work!! Our sales rep Pete was the best to work with, we highly recommend him to anyone in the market for landscaping. It was awesome seeing the finished results and we're incredibly excited to enjoy our new space!

Truco Services, Inc. Reviews

Jan Merideth

starstarstarstarstar (5)

TruCo installed all of our plants, trees and shrubs, drip lines, and boulders. Then they installed our amazing beautiful firepit. We loved the results and they guarantee all plants and trees up to a year. They were great and easy to work with. They listened to our needs and wants and met them 100%. Our HOA sent us a letter telling us they appreciate all the work and the way our yard looks and let us know we added value to the property. Win/Win

Palm Plants Indoor

Palm Plants Indoor

Palm Plants Indoor

Some Types of Palm Plants to Grow Indoors

With simple care tips, these palm plants can add lush greenery to your space.

An areca palm growing indoors

The Spruce / Alonda Baird

Perhaps because of their association with tropical environments, indoor palm plants can elicit feelings of peace and relaxation like no other houseplant can. Palms are good indoor plants if you can provide the proper conditions for them. So indoor palm plant identification is key to know what your exact species needs.

Several types of indoor palm trees, including the areca palm and parlor palm, tolerate most household environments quite well. But there are some important factors to consider about indoor palm plant care.

Indoor Palm Plant Care Tips

How you care for an indoor palm plant is similar to many other houseplants that come from the tropics. Most types of indoor palm trees like the same conditions we find comfortable: warm temperatures, average humidity, and moderate light. Some indoor palm plants can even tolerate low light, though this usually will result in weaker growth.

Palms are generally slow-growing and need minimal pruning to clean up dead and broken fronds. They’ll require a quality palm fertilizer to help maintain lush growth. And you must watch out for common houseplant pests, such as spider mites and scale.

Here are some of the easiest palms to grow indoors to add a breezy, tropical feel to your home:

Chinese Fan Palm (Livistona chinensis)
Chinese fan palm with feathery frond leaves in white ceramic pot next to houseplants
The Spruce / Kara Riley
The star-shaped leaves of Livistona chinensis set it apart from other palms with the more classic feathery fronds. While it’s slow-growing, this palm species’ mature height can reach 15 feet or greater. So it’s worth seeking out the subglobosa dwarf cultivar if you plan on growing the palm indoors.
Chinese fan palms do well in bright light, but younger plants can tolerate shady locations. Water when the top of the soil feels dry. Choose a large pot that will accommodate the long taproot that the Chinese fan palm produces. And feed this palm once a year in the spring with a slow-release fertilizer.
Light: Bright, indirect light; tolerates some shade
Water: Moderately moist soil
Color Varieties: Emerald green foliage

Areca Palm (Dypsis lutescens)

An areca palm growing indoors
The Spruce / Alonda Baird
Also known as the bamboo palm, the areca palm (Dypsis lutescens) is one of the easiest palms to grow indoors thanks to its tolerance for low light. It produces large, feathery green fronds that have a gentle curve.
The areca palm prefers a moderate amount of water. Plant your areca palm in fertile soil, and give it a monthly fertilizer application to maintain a lush look.
Light: Sun or shade but looks its best in bright, indirect light
Water: Moderately moist soil
Color Varieties: Yellow-green stems and light green leaves

Majesty Palm (Ravenea rivularis)

Majestic palm in wicker basket with tall dark green fronds
The Spruce / Kara Riley
The majesty palm (Ravenea rivularis) has two positive qualities that make it an ideal palm that will grow indoors: It is very shade tolerant, and it is a slow grower. However, you must be aware of two drawbacks of this palm: It needs constant moisture and humidity, and it will outgrow an indoor space over time.
If you can keep your majesty palm in a reasonably moist area, such as the kitchen or bathroom, then you can look forward to cultivating a graceful stand of dark green fronds that will add life to an empty corner of your home.
Light: Bright, indirect light for the entire day
Water: Consistently moist soil
Color Varieties: Bright green to dark green leaves

Cascade Palm (Chamaedorea cataractarum)

Green palm foliage tree isolated
As opposed to some palm trees that feature a central trunk, Chamaedorea cataractarum is a very full palm with clumps of fronds eventually reaching 6 feet tall. You’ll be able to separate mature clumps, giving you new plant material to propagate by division.

In its native habitat, the cascade palm thrives along streams and in wet lowlands, so you must irrigate it frequently when growing it indoors. Fortunately for indoor growth, cascade palms are understory plants, so they can tolerate limited light.
Light: Bright, indirect light; tolerates shade; avoid direct sunlight
Water: Consistently moist soil
Color Varieties: Dark green leaves

Parlor Palm (Chamaedorea elegans)

Parlor palm in gold pot with small green fronds on shelf next to décor items
The Spruce / Krystal Slagle
As the name suggests, the parlor palm (Chamaedorea elegans) is one of the easiest palms to grow indoors. It grows in average indoor light (or even artificial light) and typical room temperatures. And it requires no pruning other than an occasional tidying of dead branches.

Parlor palms flourish in above-average humidity. Be aware they might attract spider mites if conditions are very dry.
Light: Indirect light; avoid direct sun
Water: Consistently moist soil
Color Varieties: Light green leaves

Ponytail Palm (Beaucarnea recurvata)

Ponytail palm in white pot with long wispy fronds next to gold watering can and patterned pillows
The Spruce / Lisa Ruschioni
Indoor palm plant identification should be fairly easy for the ponytail palm (Beaucarnea recurvata), with its short, sturdy trunk and gracefully arching leaves. In fact, this plant is not a true palm at all but rather a succulent.

The swollen trunk base isn’t just ornamental; it functions as a water reservoir for the plant, making it very drought tolerant. Give your ponytail palm a sunny location for optimal plant health. Moreover, it’s fine for the ponytail palm to become pot bound; in fact, this can keep growth manageable for a tabletop specimen.
Light: Full sun; tolerates bright, indirect light
Water: Moderately moist soil, will tolerate dry conditions
Color Varieties: Light green leaves

Sago Palm (Cycas revoluta)

Sago palm in white pot with shaggy pineapple-like trunk and feather-like fronds next to white watering can and window
The Spruce / Anastasia Tretiak
If the sago palm is your first introduction to the world of indoor palm plants, you’re in for a treat. Stiff fronds grow in an upright habit from a short, shaggy trunk that resembles a pineapple. This plant (which is not a true palm but more closely related to conifers) is very slow-growing.

Choose an indoor location that receives filtered sun for four to six hours per day. The sago palm needs regular and consistent moisture, but make sure the soil surface is nearly dry between water applications.
Light: Full sun or bright, indirect light; tolerates some shade
Water: Moderately moist soil
Color Varieties: Light green leaves

The sago palm is toxic to humans and pets. So be mindful about its placement as a houseplant if you have kids or animals.

Yucca Palm (Yucca elephantipes)
Yucca palm with sharp leaves in corner of living room
The Spruce / Krystal Slagle
Indoor palm plant identification is very important when it comes to yucca palms. Yucca aloifolia, also known as the Spanish bayonet, has razor-sharp leaves and belongs outdoors. Yucca elephantipes is the spineless yucca palm, and while its leaves do have a pointy tip, the plant is unlikely to draw blood like its spiny cousin.

You might also see the indoor yucca palm sold under the name “stick yucca.” Tough strappy green leaves emerge from an attractive trunk on the yucca palm. The plants are very drought tolerant and grow in full sun or part shade.
Light: Full sun to part shade
Water: Moderately moist soil
Color Varieties: Light green to bluish-green

Palm plant Care

Successfully growing palm plant requires carefully balancing several factors: heat, light, and fertilization. Plants that are over-fertilized and grown in warm conditions, but not given enough light, will stretch out looking for more. Plants that are given too much light without a corresponding increase in fertilizer and water will scorch. The right balance indoors likely means a bright corner, with plenty of water, and less fertilizer than you probably think.
Palm plant has a reputation for being somewhat of a temperamental plant. Although palm plants are understory plants in their natural habitat, indoors it’s a good idea to provide as much light as possible. Plants that are stretching and bleached should be moved into a brighter spot for a few weeks, but don’t expose them to full sunlight.

Soil

These palms are acid-loving plants that do best with a pH level as low as 5.0, so don’t worry about a peat-based mixture acidifying and hurting your palm plant. A standard potting mix, with some extra peat mixed in, is an ideal growing medium for palm plants1. These palms need good drainage to prevent water-logged roots.

Water

Keep the potting media evenly moist, but not waterlogged. Don’t let the plant’s soil get too dry between watering or you’ll start to lose lower leaves.

Temperature and Humidity

This plant will grow fairly well in temperatures between 65 and 85 degrees Fahrenheit. It prefers high humidity but can survive in ordinary household humidity levels. In colder climates where winter air can get very dry; running a humidifier can make the plants happier. Misting the plant daily will also ensure it gets the humidity it craves. Low humidity levels can encourage insect pests.

Taylorsville, Utah

About Taylorsville, Utah

Taylorsville is a city in Salt Lake County, Utah. It is part of the Salt Lake City metropolitan area. The population was 60,448 at the time of the 2020 census. Taylorsville was incorporated from the Taylorsville–Bennion CDP and portions of the Kearns metro township on July 1, 1996. The city is located adjacent to Interstate 215 and Bangerter Highway. It is located in the middle of the Salt Lake Valley.

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Reviews for Truco Services, Inc. Taylorsville, Utah

Truco Services, Inc. Reviews

Marissa Burton

starstarstarstarstar (5)

TruCo is a great company to work with for your commercial landscaping and snow removal needs! Rob is excellent to work with. He is very timely in providing quotes and has a lot of great feedback and suggestions to provide on what will look great, fit within your budget, and is knowledgeable on plants that will thrive with Utah's ever changing weather conditions. I have been impressed with TruCo's landscape maintenance as well as landscape projects which have had a quick turnaround time. I would highly recommend using TruCo!

Truco Services, Inc. Reviews

Yvonne Olson

starstarstarstarstar (5)

I experienced excellent all around service from landscape improvement design, scheduling and professional installation completed within the timeline we discussed. Rob, the manager does an excellent job of communicating, overseeing the install crew and making sure his customers are 100% satisfied with the job. Highly recommend TruCo for all landscaping needs.

Truco Services, Inc. Reviews

Raymond Ferraro

starstarstarstarstar (5)

Michael the tree guy is so smart.  He knows all about tree removal, cutting and tree trimming services.  Truco did amazing work for me.  We had 16 very old and mature trees removed. The Truco team showed up on time ready to get the job done.  They did amazing with clean up truly respect your property and your life.  Communication was really good.  They needed to move some things to get the stump grinder to our yard they put things back with no issues.  Extremely professional and truly know what they're doing.  If anyone is looking for professional tree removal or tree service you really should call Jason or Michael at Truco.

Truco Services, Inc. Reviews

Heather Whiting

starstarstarstarstar (5)

We hired TruCo to do a new install of sprinklers, sod, spigot, and bury downspouts. We even have a wifi transmitter for our control box we can access from an app on our phones! We absolutely love the professionalism and quality of their work!! Our sales rep Pete was the best to work with, we highly recommend him to anyone in the market for landscaping. It was awesome seeing the finished results and we're incredibly excited to enjoy our new space!

Truco Services, Inc. Reviews

Jan Merideth

starstarstarstarstar (5)

TruCo installed all of our plants, trees and shrubs, drip lines, and boulders. Then they installed our amazing beautiful firepit. We loved the results and they guarantee all plants and trees up to a year. They were great and easy to work with. They listened to our needs and wants and met them 100%. Our HOA sent us a letter telling us they appreciate all the work and the way our yard looks and let us know we added value to the property. Win/Win

Jade Plant Care

Jade Plant Care

Jade Plant Care

Jade plants (Crassula ovata or C. argentea), also known as lucky plants or money plants, are a favorite houseplant thanks to their adaptability and attractive, gem-like green leaves. With a bonsai tree-like growth habit, these charming and easy-to-propagate plants can grow well in any area of your home with bright, indirect light. Jade plants can beautify your space for years with the right conditions and a little routine care. If you have pets in the household, be careful to keep your jade plant out of their reach, as the entirety of the plant (both leaves and stem) is toxic to pets.

Botanical Name: Crassula ovata or C. argentea
Common Name: Jade plant, lucky plant, money plant
Plant Type: Succulent
Mature Size: 5 feet tall
Sun Exposure: Bright, direct light
Soil Type: Fast-draining soil
Soil pH: 6.1 to 6.3
Toxicity: Toxic to pets1

Plant Care

Jade plants are some of the hardiest succulents available. With the right care and growing conditions, your plant can live a long, flourishing life. While some varieties are dwarf types, others can grow up to five feet tall when mature.

Allow your jade plant’s soil to nearly dry out between watering, but always be sure to water thoroughly. When displayed in areas with less light, it will need watering less frequently. During the summer months, when your plant is in growth mode, keep the soil slightly moist. Fertilize your jade plant every four months or so. Road side trees are especially prone to abiotic stress by exhaust fumes, toxic road debris, soil compaction, and drought which makes them susceptible to fungal infections and various plant pests. When tree removal is not an option, because of road ecology considerations, the main challenge is to achieve road safety (visibility of road signs, blockage-free lanes, etc.) while maintaining tree health.

These comprehensive care tips will guide you through the process of selecting, planting, and caring for the right tree for your space.

It’s important to remember that proper tree care starts when you select a tree. And what you do to your tree in its first few years of life will affect its shape, strength, and even its lifespan. Following these steps will make sure your tree gets a good start for a healthy life.

Jade Plant Care: Best Growing Conditions for Jade Plants

Jade plants are succulents that grow best in dry conditions with bright light, low humidity, and cool temperatures. Plant your jade in fast-draining soil like a potting mix formulated for cacti or succulents.

Choose a spot in a south-facing window: Aim for at least four hours of direct sunlight each day to give your jade plant the brightest light possible. To create that signature reddish tinge on its paddle-shaped leaves, display you’re jade in a spot with more light.

If you plan to move your jade plant outside for the summer, let it acclimate gradually. Start with a shady spot, then slowly move it to sunnier areas until it’s in full sun.

When it comes to watering, if you start noticing yellow or drooping leaves, your plant likely needs water. Conversely, waterlogged soil or root rot are signs you need to scale back the watering.

On the hottest days of the year (above 90 degrees), move your jades into the shade to avoid sunburn. Check soil moisture levels during this time, and water accordingly so the plant doesn’t dry out.

Despite the fact that they’re sun-loving succulents, jade plants grow well indoors thanks to their adaptability to temperature. While temps between 50 degrees and 70 degrees are preferred, jade plants can tolerate temperatures between 40 and 100 degrees without damage. Especially for variegated species, moderate temperature by placing your jade plant further away from windows during extreme temperatures outside.

Types of Jade Plants

While there are over 1,400 types of jade plants, some of the most common variants include ‘Tricolor’ (pink flowers at certain times of the year), ‘Variegata’ (ivory leaves streaked with green), ‘Sunset’ (yellow leaves with red tips), ‘Red’ (reddish-purple leaves), ‘Monstruosa Hobbit’ (curled yellow-green leaves), ‘Monstruosa Gollum’ (elongated leaves), ‘Copper’ (green leaves with bronze edges), ‘Bluebird’ (gray-blue leaves with red tips), and ‘Ripple Leaf’ (wavy-edged leaves).

How to Propagate Jade Plants

The jade plant is one of the easiest plants to propagate by stem or leaf cuttings, although the latter takes longer to show new growth. Here are the best ways to propagate your jade plant:

How to Propagate Jade Plants via Stem Cuttings

Step 1: Use clean, sharp gardening shears to cut a thick stem (3 to 5 inches long) with healthy leaves. Remove the lower leaves, then set the cutting in a sunny spot for a few days until the cut end forms a callus that’s lighter in color and feels firm.
Step 2: Fill a small pot with succulent soil and create a long, thin hole in the center. To help roots grow faster, apply rooting hormone (powdered or liquid) to the bottom inch of the callused stem. Gently place the stem into the pot, then pat down the soil until the cutting stands up on its own.

Step 3: Keep the cutting out of direct sunlight for three to four weeks. Once new growth appears, gradually move it closer to a window with bright sunlight. Water sparingly during this time.

How to Propagate Jade Plants via Leaf Cuttings

Step 1: Using a clean, sharp blade, remove a large, healthy-looking leaf.

Step 2: Place the leaf onto dry succulent soil away from direct sunlight until roots begin to grow. Rooting hormone can be applied to the cut end of the leaf, and a mix of equal parts succulent soil and perlite or vermiculite can lighten the soil texture to encourage growth.

Step 3: Look for tiny roots to sprout from the cut end of the leaf, which can take several weeks. Place the leaf in a small pot of fast-draining soil mix such as a perlite-sand blend. New growth will appear, and the original leaf will shrivel completely as the roots are established.

Jade succulent plant: Potting and Repotting

Since jade plants are so slow-growing, it’s not urgent to repot your plant on a regular basis—they can live happily in a too-small container for years. Jades should be repotted every few years as a matter of routine, and they can be safely repotted any time of year. Choose a pot no more than two sizes larger than the current vessel. The best option is a ceramic pot with ample drainage.

Common Problems With Jade Plants

Jade plants are relatively easy to care for, but there are a few common problems you may encounter. When you’re growing your plant, watch out for these signs that it needs extra care:

Root Rot

Since jade plants store water in their fleshy leaves, it’s important to avoid overwatering or poorly-drained soil, which can cause root rot. Dropping leaves, dark or soft stems or leaves, and mushy brown roots are all common signs. Treat this by taking the plant out of the pot, then removing as much soil as possible. Allow the plant to air out for a few days, then repot it in fresh succulent mix once the roots are dry.

Spotty, discolored, or dropping leaves on a jade plant that hasn’t been watered in a while can indicate the opposite problem: drought stress. If you see these signs, water the plant and monitor the soil moisture going forward.

Mealybugs

Watch out for mealybugs, which can infest your jade plant with a white cotton-like substance. Treat mealybugs by swabbing the entire plant with a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol, then rinse the leaves and stems with water or insecticidal soap.
Continue treatment until the infestation has disappeared. Mealybugs nestle in the space where leaves and stems meet, so check those crevices when treating the plant.

How to Get Jade Plants to Bloom

Some specimens, particularly those that are pot-bound or mature, will sprout small white or pink flowers in winter. If your jade is in a space with lights on overnight, moving it to a place that’s dark at night in the fall can help to promote blooming, which is triggered by the longer nights in winter.

FAQs

Are Jade Plants Easy to Care for?

Jade plants are especially easy to care for when it comes to common houseplants. They are very adaptable to temperature and can thrive in any space with bright, direct light.

How Fast do Jade Plants Grow?

An indoor jade plant typically grows about 2 inches each year but may grow faster in a very sunny area.

How Long Can Jade Plants Live?

Species like jade plants in the Crassula ovata family can live for several decades, with some variants surviving upwards of 100 years.

What’s the Difference Between Jade Plants and Elephant Bush?

Although they look similar, elephant bush (Portulacaria afra) is not related to jade plants. Native to South Africa, elephant bush has darker stems and grows less upright than jade plants.

Can Jade Plants Grow Indoors?

While they don’t grow as fast as they do outside, jade plants are hardy houseplants that can thrive indoors with simple care steps.

Layton, Utah

About Layton, Utah

Layton is a city in Davis County, Utah, United States. It is part of the Ogden-Clearfield Metropolitan Statistical Area. As of the 2020 census, the city had a population of 81,773, with 2022 estimates showing a slight increase to 84,665. Layton is the most populous city in Davis County and the ninth most populous in Utah.

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Driving Directions in Layton, Utah to Truco Services, Inc.

Driving Directions from Andy's Stump And Tree Service to 4640 Commerce Dr, Murray, UT 84107, USA

Driving Directions from Tree Takers to 4640 Commerce Dr, Murray, UT 84107, USA

Driving Directions from Harmon & Sons to 4640 Commerce Dr, Murray, UT 84107, USA

Driving Directions from Stewart's Lawn Care and Pest Control to 4640 Commerce Dr, Murray, UT 84107, USA

Driving Directions from Green Pointe Tree Care to 4640 Commerce Dr, Murray, UT 84107, USA

Driving Directions from Nye's Tree Service - Ogden to 4640 Commerce Dr, Murray, UT 84107, USA

Driving Directions from All Wood's Tree Service to 4640 Commerce Dr, Murray, UT 84107, USA

Driving Directions from Alpine Tree & Stump Removal to 4640 Commerce Dr, Murray, UT 84107, USA

Driving Directions from Nubbs Stump Removal to 4640 Commerce Dr, Murray, UT 84107, USA

Driving Directions from Page's Professional Tree Services to 4640 Commerce Dr, Murray, UT 84107, USA

Driving Directions from Diamond Tree Experts to 4640 Commerce Dr, Murray, UT 84107, USA

Driving Directions from Pua Ohana Tree Trimming And Landscaping LLC to 4640 Commerce Dr, Murray, UT 84107, USA

Reviews for Truco Services, Inc. Layton, Utah

Truco Services, Inc. Reviews

Marissa Burton

starstarstarstarstar (5)

TruCo is a great company to work with for your commercial landscaping and snow removal needs! Rob is excellent to work with. He is very timely in providing quotes and has a lot of great feedback and suggestions to provide on what will look great, fit within your budget, and is knowledgeable on plants that will thrive with Utah's ever changing weather conditions. I have been impressed with TruCo's landscape maintenance as well as landscape projects which have had a quick turnaround time. I would highly recommend using TruCo!

Truco Services, Inc. Reviews

Yvonne Olson

starstarstarstarstar (5)

I experienced excellent all around service from landscape improvement design, scheduling and professional installation completed within the timeline we discussed. Rob, the manager does an excellent job of communicating, overseeing the install crew and making sure his customers are 100% satisfied with the job. Highly recommend TruCo for all landscaping needs.

Truco Services, Inc. Reviews

Raymond Ferraro

starstarstarstarstar (5)

Michael the tree guy is so smart.  He knows all about tree removal, cutting and tree trimming services.  Truco did amazing work for me.  We had 16 very old and mature trees removed. The Truco team showed up on time ready to get the job done.  They did amazing with clean up truly respect your property and your life.  Communication was really good.  They needed to move some things to get the stump grinder to our yard they put things back with no issues.  Extremely professional and truly know what they're doing.  If anyone is looking for professional tree removal or tree service you really should call Jason or Michael at Truco.

Truco Services, Inc. Reviews

Heather Whiting

starstarstarstarstar (5)

We hired TruCo to do a new install of sprinklers, sod, spigot, and bury downspouts. We even have a wifi transmitter for our control box we can access from an app on our phones! We absolutely love the professionalism and quality of their work!! Our sales rep Pete was the best to work with, we highly recommend him to anyone in the market for landscaping. It was awesome seeing the finished results and we're incredibly excited to enjoy our new space!

Truco Services, Inc. Reviews

Jan Merideth

starstarstarstarstar (5)

TruCo installed all of our plants, trees and shrubs, drip lines, and boulders. Then they installed our amazing beautiful firepit. We loved the results and they guarantee all plants and trees up to a year. They were great and easy to work with. They listened to our needs and wants and met them 100%. Our HOA sent us a letter telling us they appreciate all the work and the way our yard looks and let us know we added value to the property. Win/Win